Gendering the Recession PDF ePub eBook

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Gendering the Recession free pdf This timely, necessary collection of essays provides feminist analyses of a recession-era media culture characterized by the reemergence and refashioning of familiar gender tropes, including crisis masculinity, coping women, and postfeminist self-renewal. Interpreting media forms as diverse as reality television, financial journalism, novels, lifestyle blogs, popular cinema, and advertising, the contributors reveal gendered narratives that recur across media forms too often considered in isolation from one another. They also show how, with a few notable exceptions, recession-era popular culture promotes affective normalcy and transformative individual enterprise under duress while avoiding meaningful critique of the privileged white male or the destructive aspects of Western capitalism. By acknowledging the contradictions between political rhetoric and popular culture, and between diverse screen fantasies and lived realities, Gendering the Recession helps to make sense of our postboom cultural moment. Contributors. Sarah Banet-Weiser, Hamilton Carroll, Hannah Hamad, Aniko Imre, Suzanne Leonard, Isabel Molina-Guzman, Sinead Molony, Elizabeth Nathanson, Diane Negra, Tim Snelson, Yvonne Tasker, Pamela Thoma

About Diane Negra

Diane Negra is Professor of Film Studies and Screen Culture and Head of Film Studies at University College Dublin. Yvonne Tasker is Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of East Anglia. Negra and Tasker are the coeditors of Interrogating Postfeminism: Gender and the Politics of Popular Culture, also published by Duke University Press.

Details Book

Author : Diane Negra
Publisher : Duke University Press
Data Published : 28 March 2014
ISBN : 0822356961
EAN : 9780822356967
Format Book : PDF, Epub, DOCx, TXT
Number of Pages : 320 pages
Age + : 15 years
Language : English
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