Living Language and Dead Reckoning PDF ePub eBook

Books Info:

Living Language and Dead Reckoning free pdf Turning frequently to First Nations people, Ted Chamberlin looks at their culture and asks what it means to listen. In response, he notes that we take great pleasure in the comforts of narration, of finding our way within a story, a kind of 'dead reckoning' out at sea when the fog rolls in and we experience 'being almost lost'. Much of the essay focuses on people from around the world who have often been described as pre-literate. Chamberlin takes issue with this view and argues that such people 'read' a whole host of signs and stories, and that in understanding how this reading takes place we can understand something of our own habits of reading and listening. Whereas scholars such as McLuhan and Ong have claimed that such cultures are 'imprisoned in the present', Chamberlin points out that this is demonstrable nonsense. All cultures are both oral and written, he argues, and knowledge comes from both listening and reading. Employing his own position as a 'teller of tales' he asks whether we believe the teller or the tale, and draws attention to the importance of not only the storyteller but also the community of listeners.

About J. Edward Chamberlin

J. Edward Chamberlin was born in Vancouver and educated at the universities of British Columbia, Oxford and Toronto. He is now University Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. His books include The Harrowing of Eden: White Attitudes Towards Native Americans (1975), Ripe was the Drowsy Hour: The Age of Oscar Wilde (1977), Come Back to Me My Language: Poetry and the West Indies (1993), and If This Is Your Land, Where Are Your Stories?: Finding Common Ground (2003).

Details Book

Author : J. Edward Chamberlin
Publisher : Ronsdale Press
Data Published : 28 February 2006
ISBN : 1553800370
EAN : 9781553800378
Format Book : PDF, Epub, DOCx, TXT
Number of Pages : 36 pages
Age + : 15 years
Language : English
Rating :

Reviews Living Language and Dead Reckoning



17 Comments Add a comment




Related eBooks Download


  • Mellodrama, the Mellotron Story free pdfMellodrama, the Mellotron Story

    Mellodrama explores the rising and falling fortunes of the Mellotron and the Chamberlin - the first musical keyboards to 'sample' the sounds of other instruments. The story begins when Harry Chamberlin recorded musicians from the Lawrence Welk Orchestra to create sound banks for the machine he built in his California garage in the 1950s..


  • Juergen Teller: Woo! free pdfJuergen Teller: Woo!

    The concept for this book is an extension of Juergen Teller: Woo.. held at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London in 2013. As part of the exhibition. Teller was invited to curate a selection of photographs in the ICA Fox Reading Room..


  • Listening Lotto free pdfListening Lotto

    Reinforce listening and early reading skills. phonemic awareness. positional concepts. and much more with these Listening Lotto games. To play. students listen to the sounds on the CD and place tokens on the images on their game cards that match what they hear..


  • Listening Lotto free pdfListening Lotto

    Reinforce listening and early reading skills. phonemic awareness. positional concepts. and much more with these Listening Lotto games. To play. students listen to the sounds on the CD and place tokens on the images on their game cards that match what they hear..


  • Reading Journal free pdfReading Journal

    Reading Journal A Diary For Book Lovers is the perfect journal for keeping a history of the books you have read and want to read all in one place. This reading journal will be a pleasure to fill out with a great reading quote on each page and separate sections for recording a plethora of information about the books you have read..


  • Living Language and Dead Reckoning free pdfLiving Language and Dead Reckoning

    . Turning frequently to First Nations people, Ted Chamberlin looks at their culture and asks what it means to listen. In response, he notes that we take great pleasure in the comforts of narration, of