Transport, Climate Change and the City PDF ePub eBook

Books Info:

Transport, Climate Change and the City free pdf Sustainable mobility has long been sought after in cities around the world, particularly in industrialised countries, but also increasingly in the emerging cities in Asia. Progress however appears difficult to make as the private car, still largely fuelled by petrol or diesel, remains the mainstream mode of use. Transport is the key sector where carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions seem difficult to reduce. Transport, Climate Change and the City seeks to develop achievable and low transport CO2 emission futures in a range of international case studies, including in London, Oxfordshire, Delhi, Jinan and Auckland. The aim is that the scenarios as developed, and the consideration of implementation and governance issues, can help us plan for and achieve attractive future travel behaviours at the city level. The alternative is to continue with only incremental progress against CO2 reduction targets, to 'sleepwalk' into climate change difficulties, oil scarcity, a poor quality of life, and to continue with the high traffic casualty figures. The topic is thus critical, with transport viewed as central to the achievement of the sustainable city and reduced CO2 emissions.

About Robin Hickman

Robin Hickman is a Senior Lecturer at the Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, and Visiting Research Associate at the Transport Studies Unit, University of Oxford, UK. David Banister is Professor of Transport Studies and Director of the Transport Studies Unit, University of Oxford, UK.

Details Book

Author : Robin Hickman
Publisher : Routledge
Data Published : 20 January 2014
ISBN : 0415660025
EAN : 9780415660020
Format Book : PDF, Epub, DOCx, TXT
Number of Pages : 400 pages
Age + : 18 years
Language : English
Rating :

Reviews Transport, Climate Change and the City



17 Comments Add a comment




Related eBooks Download


  • Maritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge free pdfMaritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge

    International maritime transport is the backbone of the world globalized economy. It is a significant contributor to global CO2 emissions but also likely to be affected by wide-ranging and potentially devastating climate change impacts associated with rising sea levels and increased frequency/intensity of extreme weather events..


  • Maritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge free pdfMaritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge

    International maritime transport is the backbone of the world globalized economy. It is a significant contributor to global CO2 emissions but also likely to be affected by wide-ranging and potentially devastating climate change impacts associated with rising sea levels and increased frequency/intensity of extreme weather events..


  • Maritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge free pdfMaritime Transport and the Climate Change Challenge

    International maritime transport is the backbone of the world globalized economy. It is a significant contributor to global CO2 emissions but also likely to be affected by wide-ranging and potentially devastating climate change impacts associated with rising sea levels and increased frequency/intensity of extreme weather events..


  • Planning Sustainable Transport free pdfPlanning Sustainable Transport

    Transport choices must be changed if we are to cope with sustainability and climate change but that may only be done if we understand how the whole transport system works -- how the different modes are used in combination..


  • Towards Sustainable Road Transport free pdfTowards Sustainable Road Transport

    Increasing pressure on global reserves of petroleum at a time of growing demand for personal transport in developing countries. together with concerns over atmospheric pollution and carbon dioxide emissions..


  • Transport, Climate Change and the City free pdfTransport, Climate Change and the City

    . Sustainable mobility has long been sought after in cities around the world, particularly in industrialised countries, but also increasingly in the emerging cities in Asia. Progress however appears d