Mrs. Robinson's Disgrace PDF ePub eBook

Books Info:

Mrs. Robinson's Disgrace free pdf "I think people marry far too much- it is such a lottery, and for a poor woman--bodily and morally the husband's slave--a very doubtful happiness." --Queen Victoria to her recently married daughter VickyHeadstrong, high-spirited, and already widowed, Isabella Walker became Mrs. Henry Robinson at age 31 in 1844. Her first husband had died suddenly, leaving his estate to a son from a previous marriage, so she inherited nothing. A successful civil engineer, Henry moved them, by then with two sons, to Edinburgh's elegant society in 1850. But Henry traveled often and was cold and remote when home, leaving Isabella to her fantasies.No doubt thousands of Victorian women faced the same circumstances, but Isabella chose to record her innermost thoughts-and especially her infatuation with a married Dr. Edward Lane-in her diary. Over five years the entries mounted-passionate, sensual, suggestive. One fateful day in 1858 Henry chanced on the diary and, broaching its privacy, read Isabella's intimate entries. Aghast at his wife's perceived infidelity, Henry petitioned for divorce on the grounds of adultery. Until that year, divorce had been illegal in England, the marital bond being a cornerstone of English life. Their trial would be a cause celebre, threatening the foundations of Victorian society with the specter of "a new and disturbing figure: a middle class wife who was restless, unhappy, avid for arousal." Her diary, read in court, was as explosive as Flaubert's Madame Bovary, just published in France but considered too scandalous to be translated into English until the 1880s.As she accomplished in her award-winning and bestselling "The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher," Kate Summerscale brilliantly recreates the Victorian world, chronicling in exquisite and compelling detail the life of Isabella Robinson, wherein the longings of a frustrated wife collided with a society clinging to rigid ideas about sanity, the boundaries of privacy, the institution of marriage, and female sexuality.

About Kate Summerscale

Kate Summerscale is the author of the bestselling books "The Queen of Whale Cay" and T"he Suspicions of Mr. Whicher." She lives in London with her son.

Details Book

Author : Kate Summerscale
Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Data Published : 21 May 2013
ISBN : 1608199347
EAN : 9781608199341
Format Book : PDF, Epub, DOCx, TXT
Number of Pages : 303 pages
Age + : 15 years
Language : English
Rating :

Reviews Mrs. Robinson's Disgrace



17 Comments Add a comment




Related eBooks Download


  • The Life of Isabella Bird free pdfThe Life of Isabella Bird

    Isabella Bird (1831-1904) was one of the most famous Victorian female explorers. and the first woman member of the Royal Geographical Society. Bird was recommended an open-air life from an early age as a cure for physical and nervous complaints..


  • Mrs Robinson's Disgrace free pdfMrs Robinson's Disgrace

    On a mild winter's evening in 1850. Isabella Robinson set out for a party. Her carriage bumped across the wide cobbled streets of Edinburgh's Georgian New Town and drew up at 8 Royal Circus..


  • Mrs Robinson's Disgrace free pdfMrs Robinson's Disgrace

    On a mild winter's evening in 1850. Isabella Robinson set out for a party. Her carriage bumped across the wide cobbled streets of Edinburgh's Georgian New Town and drew up at 8 Royal Circus..


  • Queen Isabella free pdfQueen Isabella

    In this vibrant biography. acclaimed author Alison Weir reexamines the life of Isabella of England. one of history s most notorious and charismatic queens..


  • Roses for Isabella free pdfRoses for Isabella

    Roses for Isabella invites us to experience life in Ecuador through the eyes of a young girl who keeps a journal and loves to write. We learn about Isabella's parents who work on one of the hundreds of farms growing beautiful roses that are sold all over the world..


  • Mrs. Robinson's Disgrace free pdfMrs. Robinson's Disgrace

    Downloadable Audio Books Free. "I think people marry far too much- it is such a lottery, and for a poor woman--bodily and morally the husband's slave--a very doubtful happiness." --Queen Victoria to h